The simple game – the Cruyff concept (3)

The system can be a perfect one; however, the players can ruin it. The 4-3-3 system was designed to offer a maximum number of game options to the ball carrier.

Because of this, when the have the ball, players are instructed to pass to the nearest team-mate and then to break free from their opponent to get the ball back. Simple game: pass and break free!

Theoretically, the 4-3-3 creates spaces to players in order to allow the development of the game through the short passing system. In practice, one needs years of training, starting with childhood and junior hood, in order to accomplish it.

In time, the objective is no longer maintaining possession, but to have possession until a player breaks free to finish. Paradoxically, what a player does when having the ball becomes as important as what the one having possession does.

The player without the ball has to make a series of technical-tactical gestures in order to receive the ball and menace the opponents’ goal: changes in direction, changes of running speed, tricks, turns and stops.

Moreover, he has to perfectly harmonize with the one having the ball, the pass has to come at the right time, but the one establishing that ideal time is the player without the ball by his break-free.

It is not an easy thing to play simply, the ball has to circulate permanently, one has to draw rhombuses or other geometrical figures on the pitch. The quality of the players is essential. Not all the teams have a Xavi, Iniesta or Messi.

The concept of simple game has evolved, growing and developing permanently. Nobody thought that Cruyff presence at Barcelona and the implementation of his game philosophy would create over the years the best club of all times.

The reason why Cruyff influenced football so impressively was that he gave the world something new and unique.

Irrespective of the game style you appreciate, the Dutchman unveiled a new path and created a legend that will live on permanently.

“Simplicity is the most sophisticated concept!”
Leonardo da Vinci

Translated by Cristian Sandor